House Kheperu

Reincarnation

An Introduction to Guided Visualation Part II

Written by: Michelle Belanger

This is part two of a series of exercises designed to introduce you to the art of visualization, also known as active imagination. This exercise focuses further on your five senses and helps you determine which sense is your strongest one for visualizing. Visualization techniques serve as the underpinnings for a wide variety of metaphysical disciplines, including guided imagery, past life regression, healing with energy, item construction, and numerous magickal workings.

Imagining the Five Senses
It's important not to be confused by the term “visualization”. “Visualization” is a general term for any exercise that harnesses the power of your imagination. “Visualization” should not be read as an exercise that is specifically visual in nature. Implicit in the term is a creative imagining that appeals to any and all of the senses. “Visualization” is used purely for the sake of semantic simplicty.
In the previous exercise, you started to formulate an idea of what kind of sensory thinker you are. Now let's experiment with a couple of simple visualizations. Take a little quiet time some place where there are few things to distract you and try the exercises below. Spend five to ten minutes on each of them.

Taste
Think back to a time when someone baked fresh chocolate chip cookies for you. Imagine that you ar_ eating one right now. Try to remember the delicate sweetness of the cookie, underscored by just a touch of saltiness. Imagine the taste of the melted chocolate chips until you can almost feel them on your tongue. Call to mind just exactly how the warm cookie and the chocolate chips went together until you fully re-experience the taste.

1. How easy was this visualization for you?

2. How vividly were you able to call the image to mind?

3. Was there any point at which the visualization started to feel real?

4. On a scale of 1 to 5, rate the appeal the sense of taste has for you.

Sound
Call to mind a piece of music you like to regularly listen to. Now replay that song in your head as vividly as possible. If the song has lyrics, try to hear the singer intoning each word. Try to hear the voices of each individual instrument. If you can, play the song all the way through, focusing on each individual note and rhythm.

1. How easy was this visualization for you?

2. How vividly were you able to call the image to mind?

3. Was there any point at which the visualization started to feel real?

4. On a scale of 1 to 5, rate the appeal the sense of hearing has for you.

Sight
Imagine a piece of jewelry you have admired. Picture it in your mind until you can see each and every detail. Focus on the image until you can see every nuance of color. Think about the texture of the various elements of this piece of jewelry and how light and shadow play over its surfaces. Try to picture it as clearly as if you had a snapshot of it in front of you.

1. How easy was this visualization for you?

2. How vividly were you able to call the image to mind?

3. Was there any point at which the visualization started to feel real?

4. On a scale of 1 to 5, rate the appeal the sense of sight has for you.

Touch
Call to mind a favorite piece of clothing you have worn. Imagine holding this piece of clothing as you are putting it on. Feel the material in your fingers until you are aware of every detail of its texture. Imagine yourself pulling this piece of clothing on. Feel it slide over your skin. Feel the differentiations in texture until you can clearly distinguish each of its folds and seams.

1. How easy was this visualization for you?

2. How vividly were you able to call the image to mind?

3. Was there any point at which the visualization started to feel real?

4. On a scale of 1 to 5, rate the appeal the sense of touch has for you.

Smell
Think about a favorite perfume or cologne you have smelled. Call the scent to mind as clearly as you possibly can. Think of how it first smells, then think about the undertones of scent that you can perceive just after that first intake of breath. Call the cologne to mind so clearly that you can recreate each layer of scent as if you are smelling it right now.

1. How easy was this visualization for you?

2. How vividly were you able to call the image to mind?

3. Was there any point at which the visualization started to feel real?

4. On a scale of 1 to 5, rate the appeal the sense of touch has for you.

Final Questions:
1. Going into this exercise, which of the five sensory experiences did you think would be easiest for you?

2. Which of the five exercises did you actually have the most success with?

3. Which of the five exercises gave you trouble?

4. Of all five exercises, which did you spend the most time doing? Did you spend this much time because it was hard to focus at first, or did you spend a lot of time because you had a very vivid image in your mind? What does this tell you about your relationship with that particular sense?

5. If you were able to imagine one of the exercises very vividly, how real did the experience start to feel for you? Do you think you can achieve the same feel of reality for any exercise that appeals strongly to that particular sense?

6. What does your experience here tell you about how visualization appeals to you? What are your strong points? What do you think you need to focus on improving? How can you apply this knowledge to future exercises dealing with visualization?